Tag italian language

Tag italian language

BRR, CHE FREDDO!! It’s freezing cold!

antonella 1. February 2021 Tags: , , , ANDIAMO No comments
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English Translation:
“Brr che freddo (it’s cold).
This is what we say when it’s “freddo cane” (freezing cold, litterally translated in dog-cold). The cold can also be a “thief-cold”.
But also a person can be “fredda come il ghiaccio” (cold as ice), when for example he/she communicates bad news to us “a freddo” (in cold bood, unemotionally), making us “sciogliere come neve al sole” (melt like snow in the sun) and why not, even making us “sudare freddo” (be in a cold sweat).
So cover up for today, because brrr “fa un freddo cane” (it’s freezing cold).

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TO BE LIKE “CHEESE ON MACARONI”?

lisa 22. May 2019 Tags: , , , CURIOSITIES No comments
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SAYINGS AND ITALIANITY

When it rains heavily, cats and dogs are falling from the sky in English (Raining cats and dogs).

In German, thumbs are pressed to wish good luck (Daumen drücken).

In France, on the other hand, you should turn your tongue seven times before speaking (Il faut tourner sept fois sa langue dans sa bouche avant de parler).

These expressions might not make sense to foreigners, but are in fact just typical expressions of each language.

In “Bel Paese” dogs and cats will never fall down from the sky when it rains, but the rain is “a catinelle” (as if someone would pour water from the sky).

You cross your fingers to wish good luck (without pressing your thumbs) and count up to 10 before speaking (without turning your tongue like French people).

Each language has its own idioms, fascinating linguistic expressions that represent a unique combination of history, culture and tradition.

In fact, the past of a people hides in every word, every phrase, and every idiomatic expression.

To better understand idioms in Italian language, we met Ester, an Italian teacher at “con ester Vivitalia” in Nuremberg. Read More